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Surfactant for the management of pediatric hydrocarbon ingestion

Published:September 14, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2018.09.016
      Hydrocarbons are a common source of ingestion in children and encompass a wide array of compounds that include essential oils, lighter fluids, and household cleaners [
      • Makrygianni E.A.
      • Palamidou F.
      • Kaditis A.G.
      Respiratory complications following hydrocarbon aspiration in children.
      ]. Toxicity after ingestion depends on the chemical properties of each compound including viscosity, volatility, surface tension and lipophilicity [
      • Tormoehlen L.M.
      • Tekulve K.J.
      • Nanagas K.S.
      Hydrocarbon toxicity: a review.
      ].
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