Advertisement

Vaginal cuff dehiscence – A potential surgical emergency

  • Ethan Sterk
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Department of Emergency Medicine, Loyola University Chicago – Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Medical Center, 2160 South First Avenue, Bldg 110 – Emergency Medicine, Maywood, IL 60153, United States.
    Affiliations
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Loyola University Medical Center, United States

    Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Medical Center, United States
    Search for articles by this author
  • Keven Stonewall
    Affiliations
    Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Medical Center, United States
    Search for articles by this author
Published:November 15, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2019.09.013

      Abstract

      Vaginal cuff dehiscence is a rare, but potentially morbid, complication of a total hysterectomy. Bowel evisceration can lead to serious sequelae and is considered a surgical emergency however there is a paucity of information on it in the Emergency Medicine literature. We present the case of a 40 year old female with a chief complaint of vaginal bleeding and severe abdominal pain after sexual intercourse. She was s/p total laparoscopic hysterectomy 3 months earlier. The history and physical exam were concerning for vaginal cuff dehiscence (VCD). The patient underwent an Exam Under Anesthesia (EUA) and subsequent laparoscopic repair of the vaginal cuff defect and fully recovered.

      Keywords

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to The American Journal of Emergency Medicine
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Hur H.C.
        • Lightfoot M.
        • McMillin M.G.
        • Kho K.A.
        Vaginal cuff dehiscence and evisceration: a review of the literature.
        Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol. 2016; 28: 297
        • Fuchs Weizman N.
        • Einarsson J.I.
        • Wang K.C.
        • et al.
        Vaginal cuff dehiscence: risk factors and associated morbidities.
        JSLS. 2015; 19
      1. Hur, H. (Jan 2019). Vaginal cuff dehiscence after hysterectomy. UptoDate. Available from http://www.uptodate.com/contents/vaginal-cuff-dehiscence-after-hysterectomy.