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A portrait of patients who die in-hospital from acute pulmonary embolism

Published:February 27, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2018.02.035
      Acute pulmonary embolism (APE) is a prevalent disease occurring in 100–200/100,000 inhabitants/year with a mortality rate of 17.4% at 90-days in the unselected population [
      • Belohlavek J.
      • Dytrych V.
      • Linhart A.
      Pulmonary embolism, part I: epidemiology, risk factors and risk stratification, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and nonthrombotic pulmonary embolism.
      ]. The predictors of early death after APE include advanced age, comorbidities, and clinical picture at presentation [
      • Goldhaber S.Z.
      • Visani L.
      • De Rosa M.
      Acute pulmonary embolism: clinical outcomes in the International Cooperative Pulmonary Embolism Registry (ICOPER).
      ], where mortality ranges from 8.1% in cases with right ventricular dysfunction to 24.5% in cardiogenic shock and 64.8% when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is required [
      • Kasper W.
      • et al.
      Management strategies and determinants of outcome in acute major pulmonary embolism: results of a multicenter registry.
      ]. Herein, we present the characteristics of a series of patients who died in-hospital from APE.
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