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Naloxone access among an urban population of opioid users

  • Jenna K. Nikolaides
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Toxikon Consortium, Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Toxicology, 1900 West Polk Street, 10th Floor, Chicago, IL 60612, USA.
    Affiliations
    Toxikon Consortium, Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Toxicology, 1900 West Polk Street, 10th Floor, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
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  • Lum Rizvanolli
    Affiliations
    Cook County Health and Hospital System, Department of Emergency Medicine, 1900 West Polk Street, 10th Floor, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
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  • Michael Rozum
    Affiliations
    Cook County Health and Hospital System, Department of Emergency Medicine, 1900 West Polk Street, 10th Floor, Chicago, IL 60612, USA

    Rush Medical College, 600 S. Paulina St, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
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  • Steven E. Aks
    Affiliations
    Toxikon Consortium, Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Toxicology, 1900 West Polk Street, 10th Floor, Chicago, IL 60612, USA

    Cook County Health and Hospital System, Department of Emergency Medicine, 1900 West Polk Street, 10th Floor, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
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Published:March 26, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2018.03.066
      Opioids, both prescription and illicit, are the main cause of drug overdose deaths. Per the CDC, opioids were involved in 33,091 deaths in 2015, and opioid overdoses have quadrupled since 1999 [
      • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
      Opioid overdose. Drug overdose death data.
      ]. The distribution of naloxone to at-risk populations has been shown to reduce the likelihood of death from an overdose [
      • Wheeler E.
      • Jones T.S.
      • Gilbert M.K.
      • Davidson P.J.
      Centers for disease control (CDC). Opioid overdose prevention programs providing naloxone to laypersons—United States, 2014.
      ] and has been recommended by most major professional medical organizations [
      • American Medical Association
      AMA adds new tools to combat opioids.
      ,
      • American College of Emergency Physicians
      Naloxone prescriptions by emergency physicians.
      ,
      • Doyon S.
      • Aks S.E.
      • Schaeffer S.
      Expanding access to naloxone in the United States.
      ,
      • World Health Organization
      Naloxone: a take-home antidote to drug overdose that saves lives.
      ]. Our urban center hosts one of the oldest naloxone distribution programs in the country [
      • Harm Reduction Coalition
      Naloxone program case studies: Chicago recovery alliance.
      ].

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        MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly Rep. 2015; 64: 631-635
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