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A non-invasive method for removing a non-deflatable bladder catheter

  • Author Footnotes
    1 Qing Cheng and Hiabo Zhang contributed equally to this paper.
    Qing Cheng
    Footnotes
    1 Qing Cheng and Hiabo Zhang contributed equally to this paper.
    Affiliations
    Department of Urology, Central South University Xiangya School of Medicine Affiliated Haikou Hospital, Haikou, China

    Department of Urology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Qing Cheng and Hiabo Zhang contributed equally to this paper.
    Hiabo Zhang
    Footnotes
    1 Qing Cheng and Hiabo Zhang contributed equally to this paper.
    Affiliations
    Department of Urology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China
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  • Guoren Wang
    Affiliations
    Department of Emergency, Central South University Xiangya School of Medicine Affiliated Haikou Hospital, Haikou, China
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  • Zhenxiang Liu
    Affiliations
    Department of Urology, Central South University Xiangya School of Medicine Affiliated Haikou Hospital, Haikou, China
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  • Qiong Sun
    Affiliations
    Department of Emergency, Central South University Xiangya School of Medicine Affiliated Haikou Hospital, Haikou, China
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  • Zhiming Bai
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Department of Urology, Central South University Xiangya School of Medicine Affiliated Haikou Hospital, 43 Renmin Blvd, Haikou 570208, China.
    Affiliations
    Department of Urology, Central South University Xiangya School of Medicine Affiliated Haikou Hospital, Haikou, China
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 Qing Cheng and Hiabo Zhang contributed equally to this paper.
Published:April 08, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2018.04.015
      A non-deflatable bladder catheter was diagnosed when only about 0.5 mL of liquid could be aspirated from the balloon, and the catheter is blocked in the bladder outlet or prostatic urethra by the undrained balloon. The cause for this is considered to be the obstruction of the balloon inflation channel and it mainly occurs in the latex catheter [
      • Khan S.A.
      • Landes F.
      • Paola A.S.
      • Ferrarotto L.
      Emergency management of the nondeflating Foley catheter balloon.
      ,
      • Huang J.G.
      • Ooi J.
      • Lawrentschuk N.
      • Chan S.T.
      • Travis D.
      • Wong L.M.
      Urinary catheter balloons should only be filled with water: testing the myth.
      ]. Because the latex catheter is made of soft material, the inflation tube is compressed, curved and deformed while adapting to the male urethral anatomy [
      • Gonzalgo M.L.
      • Walsh P.C.
      Balloon cuffing and management of the entrapped Foley catheter.
      ]. Hence, even a fine particle could block the tube. We present a novel and non-invasive method that requires no special devices and can be done in the emergency department (ED).

      Keywords

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