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Progress towards reducing crowding

Published:August 07, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2018.08.006
      Crowding is one of the greatest threats to ED function, and most crowding is driven by delays which occur after emergency medical care is finished and patients are waiting for consultation, admission or transfer involving a different part of the hospital. Multiple crowding-related interventions both inside and outside the ED have been described, in a segment of the literature fraught with publication bias [
      • Mason S.
      • Knowles E.
      • Boyle A.
      Exit block in emergency departments: a rapid evidence review.
      ] since we tend to both report and publish only the things which work.
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