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Osborn wave in hypothermia and relation to mortality

Published:August 19, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2018.08.049

      Abstract

      Background & aim

      The aim of this study was to compare hypothermia patients with and without an Osborn wave (OW) in terms of physical examination findings, laboratory results, and clinical survival.

      Methods

      The study was carried out retrospectively on hypothermic patients. The hypothermic patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 comprised patients with OW on electrocardiogram (ECG), and Group 2 comprised patients without OW on ECG. The Mann–Whitney U test was used to compare the two groups, and the relationships between the variables and the presence of OW and mortality were analyzed with ANOVA. A value of p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

      Results

      OW was detected on ECG of 41.9% of the patients (Group 1). The mean body temperature was 30.8 ± 4.1 °C in Group 1 and 33.3 ± 1.6 °C in Group 2 (p = 0.106). The mean creatinine level was 1.01 ± 0.6 mg/dl in Group 1 and 0.73 ± 0.5 mg/dl in Group 2 (p = 0.046). The mean bicarbonate level was 15.9 ± 3.8 mmol/l in Group 1 and 18.6 ± 3.5 mmol/l in Group 2 (p = 0.038). A relationship was determined between the presence of OW and pH, bicarbonate, and creatinine levels (p = 0.026; 0.013; 0.042, respectively). The mortality rate was 69.2% in Group 1 and 77.8% in Group 2 (p = 0.689).

      Conclusion

      Although there is a relationship between the decrease in bicarbonate levels, changes in kidney functions that cause acidosis, and the presence of OW, it has no effect on mortality. The presence of OW in hypothermic patients is insufficient to make a decision regarding mortality.
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