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Emergency physicians can be leaders in clinical innovation: Tips to JumpStart the engine

Published:October 20, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2018.10.037
      Emergency physicians are well suited to develop new technologies that improve patient care. In day-to-day practice in the Emergency Department (ED), clinicians face a broad range of time-sensitive medical conditions that overlap multiple specialties and care settings. Emergency Medicine practitioners have demonstrated an innovative mindsets in the past [
      Tricks of the Trade Archives.
      ,
      Tricks of the Trade Archives.
      ]. This must grow. One recent study found that of 40 devices being developed by venture capitalists tested by 400 emergency physicians, only one-quarter were thought to actually assist emergency physicians in their workflow and improve patient care [
      • Fortenko Alex
      Can Doctors Be Innovators? The Push for Clinician Driven Innovation.
      ]. It is imperative that our specialty systematically accelerates participation in technological innovation in order to develop the tools needed to improve patient care.
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