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Point-of-care ultrasound for the evaluation of non-traumatic visual disturbances in the emergency department: The VIGMO protocol

      Abstract

      Objectives

      To establish a standardized approach for the rapid and accurate identification of non-traumatic, ophthalmologic pathology in patients with eye complaints in the emergency department.

      Methods

      In this detailed protocol we offer an easy, reproducible method for the use of ocular point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) in helping practitioners identify and distinguish between common eye pathology encountered in the emergency setting: retinal detachment, vitreous detachment, vitreous hemorrhage, optic nerve pathology, and syneresis.

      Conclusions

      This protocol can help identify patients that may need urgent ophthalmology consultation those that can follow-up on an outpatient, and those that may need additional emergent testing.

      Keywords

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