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Reply to Understanding the benefits of early high-flow nasal cannula for adults with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in the ED

      We answer with pleasure the authors' comments challenging the role of high-flow oxygen therapy in rapid improvement of signs of respiratory failure as compared to standard oxygen. In this before-after study including 102 patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure treated by standard oxygen in the first period and then by high-flow oxygen therapy, we found that 61% of patients receiving high-flow presented improved signs of respiratory failure within the first hour as compared to 15% with standard oxygen [
      • Macé J.
      • Marjanovic N.
      • Faranpour F.
      • et al.
      Early high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy in adults with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in the ED: a before-after study.
      ]. These were defined by a decreased respiratory rate and an alleviation of signs of respiratory fatigue.
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      References

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      1. Azoulay E, Lemiale V, Mokart D, et al. Effect of high-flow nasal oxygen vs standard oxygen on 28-day mortality in immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory failure. JAMA Published Online First: 24 October 2018. doi:https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.2018.14282.

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