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Indications and preference considerations for using medical Cannabis in an emergency department: A National Survey

  • Kevin M. Takakuwa
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: PO Box 27574, San Francisco, CA 94127, United States of America.
    Affiliations
    Society of Cannabis Clinicians, Sebastopol, California (Dr Takakuwa); University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (Dr Schears), United States of America
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  • Raquel M. Schears
    Affiliations
    Society of Cannabis Clinicians, Sebastopol, California (Dr Takakuwa); University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (Dr Schears), United States of America
    Search for articles by this author
      Due to its Schedule I drug designation, medical cannabis continues to remain a controversial topic [
      • Takakuwa K.M.
      • Schears R.M.
      A history of the US medical cannabis movement and its importance to pediatricians: science versus politics in medicine’s greatest catch-22.
      ] despite an increasing number of US states legalizing it [
      • National Conference of State Legislatures
      ] and the growing acceptance of it socially [
      • Takakuwa K.M.
      A history of the Society of Cannabis Clinicians and its contributions and impact on the US medical cannabis movement.
      ] and even within some physicians in the medical community [
      • Takakuwa K.M.
      • Shofer F.S.
      • Schears R.M.
      The practical knowledge, experience and beliefs of US emergency medicine physicians regarding medical cannabis: a national survey.
      ]. Because of federal laws, studying cannabis in randomized controlled trials remains a monumental challenge [
      • National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
      The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC.
      ]. Meanwhile cannabis use, much by patients seeking symptomatic relief of their symptoms, is widespread. This has led to the acknowledgement and subsequent policy statement by the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) to recommend rescheduling cannabis so that it can be appropriately studied [ ].

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      References

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