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The gap of knowledge and skill – One reason for unsuccessful management of mass casualty incidents and disasters

Published:September 29, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2020.09.068
      Despite several reports confirming the requirements for a successful management of disasters and major incidents (MIDs), the available literature indicates vulnerabilities in both structural and non-structural parts of healthcare systems [
      • Khorram-Manesh A.
      • Lupesco O.
      • Friedl T.
      • et al.
      Education in disaster management: what do we offer and what do we need? Proposing a new global program.
      ,
      • Labarda C.
      • Labarda M.D.P.
      • Lamberte E.E.
      Hospital resilience in the aftermath of typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines.
      ]. The former includes the need for alternative medical facilities, and related critical infrastructure and the latter presence of qualified staff [
      • Glantz V.
      • Phatthatapornjaroen P.
      • Carlström E.
      • Khorram-Manesh A.
      Regional flexible surge capacity- a flexible response system.
      ,
      • Phattharapornjaroen P.
      • Glantz V.
      • Carlström E.
      • Dahlén Holmqvist L.
      • Khorram-Manesh A.
      Alternative leadership in flexible surge capacity – the Preceived impact of tabletop simulation exercises on Thai emergency physicians capability to manage a major incident.
      ]. Effective preparedness to respond to any emergency requires a well-planned and integrated effort by all personnel, who, equipped with the needed expertise and skills, can deal with crisis. However, not all specialists are trained for this, and some do not have the necessary knowledge and experience. Therefore, a set of clear, concise and precise training standards has been drawn up, that can be used to equip health care professionals with the necessary skills [
      • Phattharapornjaroen P.
      • Glantz V.
      • Carlström E.
      • Dahlén Holmqvist L.
      • Khorram-Manesh A.
      Alternative leadership in flexible surge capacity – the Preceived impact of tabletop simulation exercises on Thai emergency physicians capability to manage a major incident.
      ,
      • Hall M.L.
      • Lee A.C.
      • Cartwright C.
      • Marahatta S.
      • Karki J.
      • Simkhada P.
      The 2015 Nepal earthquake disaster: lessons learned one year on.
      ].
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