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Speech recognition shortens the recording time of prehospital medical documentation

Published:February 17, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2021.02.025
      Immediate information communication between prehospital and medical institutions is important for care of emergency patients [
      • Bledsoe B.E.
      • Wasden C.
      • Johnson L.
      Electronic prehospital records are often unavailable for emergency department medical decision making.
      ,
      • Laudermilch D.J.
      • Schiff M.A.
      • Nathens A.B.
      • Rosengart M.R.
      Lack of emergency medical services documentation is associated with poor patient outcomes: a validation of audit filters for prehospital trauma care.
      ]. Electronic prehospital records are preferred over handwritten records to accomplish immediate information sharing [
      • Bledsoe B.E.
      • Wasden C.
      • Johnson L.
      Electronic prehospital records are often unavailable for emergency department medical decision making.
      ]. Recent advancements in information communication technology (ICT) devices such as tablet computers or smartphones may allow for these devices to contribute to early information communication in emergency activities.

      Keywords

      Abbreviations:

      ICT (information communication technology), SR (speech recognition), WRR (word recognition rate)
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