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Using laypersons to train friends and family in Hands-Only CPR improves their willingness to perform bystander CPR

Published:February 20, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2021.02.031
      Out of hospital cardiac arrest is a leading killer in the United States [
      • Committee on the Treatment of Cardiac Arrest: Current Status and Future Directions, Board on Health Sciences Policy, Institute of Medicine
      ]. Although the successful use of Closed Chest Cardiac Message was first reported in humans in the late 1800s, it was not until 1960 that medical professionals adopted modern Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) using external cardiac compressions [
      • DeBard M.L.
      The history of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
      ]. During the 1960s, several organizations started to teach layperson CPR, and in the 1970s, a group from Seattle started the Medic II program to expand training of layperson CPR [
      • Cobbt L.A.
      • Hallstrom A.P.
      Community-based cardiopulmonary resuscitation: what have we learned?.
      ]. Bystander CPR has been shown to more than double survival of victims of cardiac arrest [
      • Hasselqvist-Ax I.
      • Riva G.
      • Herlitz J.
      • et al.
      Early cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.
      ,
      • Hansen C.M.
      • Kragholm K.
      • Pearson D.A.
      • et al.
      Association of bystander and first-responder intervention with survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in North Carolina, 2010-2013.
      ]. However, more than 50 years after being introduced to lay rescuers, bystander CPR is not being performed on many victims of cardiac arrest.
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