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Finding the optimal initial dose of intravenous ketamine for pediatric procedural sedation is still challenging

      It was with great interest that I read the article “Optimal dosing of intravenous ketamine for procedural sedation in children in the ED—a randomized controlled trial,” published by Kannikeswaran et al [
      • Kannikeswaran N
      • Lieh-Lai M
      • Malian M
      • Wang B
      • Farooqi A
      • Roback MG
      Optimal dosing of intravenous ketamine for procedural sedation in children in the ED—a randomized controlled trial.
      ] in the April issue of The American Journal of Emergency Medicine. In this article, 125 children were randomized on a convenience sample to receive 1, 1.5, or 2.0 mg/kg of intravenous (IV) ketamine for procedural sedation. The authors found that an adequate sedation was achieved with all doses of ketamine and that higher doses did not increase the risk of adverse events; besides, 1.5 or 2.0 mg/kg required less redosing and better physician satisfaction after the procedure.
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      References

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        Optimal dosing of intravenous ketamine for procedural sedation in children in the ED—a randomized controlled trial.
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