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Intranasal fentanyl improves time to analgesic delivery in sickle cell pain crises

Published:November 07, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2017.11.015
      Sickle cell disease (SCD) affects approximately 90,000 Americans [
      • Hassell K.L.
      Population estimates of sickle cell disease in the U.S..
      ]. These individuals are perennially at risk for complications of SCD with intermittent, painful vasoocclusive events (VOE) being the most common acute morbidity [
      • Platt O.S.
      • Thorington B.D.
      • Brambilla D.J.
      • et al.
      Pain in sickle cell disease. Rates and risk factors.
      ]. A third of children with SCD will experience a VOE in their first year of life, and most will have experienced a VOE by 4 years of age [
      • Bainbridge R.
      • Higgs D.R.
      • Maude G.H.
      • Serjeant G.R.
      Clinical presentation of homozygous sickle cell disease.
      ]. Accordingly, acute pain management is the most common reason for children with SCD to seek care in pediatric emergency departments (PEDs) [
      • Yusuf H.R.
      • Atrash H.K.
      • Grosse S.D.
      • Parker C.S.
      • Grant A.M.
      Emergency department visits made by patients with sickle cell disease. A descriptive study, 1999–2007.
      ].

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