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Cardiopulmonary resuscitation on television: The TVMD study

Published:March 26, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2018.03.065
      Television medical drama series (TVMD) present real and fictional clinical situations. In many of these series, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is depicted [
      • Diem S.
      • Lantos J.
      • Tulsky J.
      • et al.
      Cardiopulmonary resuscitation on television-miracles and misinformation.
      ]. Therefore, television is an important source of acquiring information about CPR [
      • Gordon P.N.
      • Williamson S.
      • Lawler P.G.
      • et al.
      As seen on TV: observational study of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in British television medical dramas.
      ]. Audience may acquire this information unintentionally, including healthcare practitioners [
      • Duarte F.
      • Einav S.
      • Varon J.
      False memories: healthcare professionals' claims of having seen a patient returning to normal activity after CPR.
      ]. The clinical scenarios and outcomes presented in TVMD, may affect the public expectations about CPR-related outcomes [
      • Berger E.
      From Dr. Kildare to Grey's Anatomy. TV physicians change real patients expectations.
      ]. We attempted to analyze TVMD portraying CPR, and comparing it to current guidelines for resuscitation as well as the outcome depicted after cardiac arrest.

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      References

        • Diem S.
        • Lantos J.
        • Tulsky J.
        • et al.
        Cardiopulmonary resuscitation on television-miracles and misinformation.
        N Engl J Med. 1996; 3341578-338
        • Gordon P.N.
        • Williamson S.
        • Lawler P.G.
        • et al.
        As seen on TV: observational study of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in British television medical dramas.
        BMJ. 1998; 317: 780-783
        • Duarte F.
        • Einav S.
        • Varon J.
        False memories: healthcare professionals' claims of having seen a patient returning to normal activity after CPR.
        Am J Emerg Med. 2016; 34: 925-927
        • Berger E.
        From Dr. Kildare to Grey's Anatomy. TV physicians change real patients expectations.
        Ann Emerg Med. 2010; 56: 21A-23A