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Pennsylvania law enforcement use of Narcan

  • Jeanne L. Jacoby
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: LVH-M-5th floor EM Residency Suite, 2545 Schoenersville Road, Bethlehem, PA 18017, USA.
    Affiliations
    Lehigh Valley Health Network, Department of Emergency and Hospital Medicine, USF Morsani College of Medicine, Lehigh Valley Campus, Cedar Crest Boulevard & I-78, Allentown, PA, USA 18103
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  • Lauren M. Crowley
    Affiliations
    Lehigh Valley Health Network, Department of Emergency and Hospital Medicine, USF Morsani College of Medicine, Lehigh Valley Campus, Cedar Crest Boulevard & I-78, Allentown, PA, USA 18103
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  • Robert D. Cannon
    Affiliations
    Lehigh Valley Health Network, Department of Emergency and Hospital Medicine, Section of Medical Toxicology, USF Morsani College of Medicine, Lehigh Valley Campus, Cedar Crest Boulevard & I-78, Allentown 18103, PA, USA
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  • Kira D. Weaver
    Affiliations
    Lehigh Valley Health Network, Department of Emergency and Hospital Medicine, USF Morsani College of Medicine, Lehigh Valley Campus, Cedar Crest Boulevard & I-78, Allentown, PA, USA 18103
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  • Tara K. Henry-Morrow
    Affiliations
    Lehigh Valley Health Network, Department of Emergency and Hospital Medicine, USF Morsani College of Medicine, Lehigh Valley Campus, Cedar Crest Boulevard & I-78, Allentown, PA, USA 18103
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  • Kathryn A. Henry
    Affiliations
    Lehigh Valley Health Network, Department of Emergency and Hospital Medicine, USF Morsani College of Medicine, Lehigh Valley Campus, Cedar Crest Boulevard & I-78, Allentown, PA, USA 18103
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  • Allison N. Kayne
    Affiliations
    Lehigh Valley Health Network, Department of Emergency and Hospital Medicine, USF Morsani College of Medicine, Lehigh Valley Campus, Cedar Crest Boulevard & I-78, Allentown, PA, USA 18103
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  • Colleen E. Urban
    Affiliations
    Lehigh Valley Health Network, Department of Emergency and Hospital Medicine, USF Morsani College of Medicine, Lehigh Valley Campus, Cedar Crest Boulevard & I-78, Allentown, PA, USA 18103
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  • Robert A. Gyory
    Affiliations
    Lehigh Valley Health Network, Department of Emergency and Hospital Medicine, USF Morsani College of Medicine, Lehigh Valley Campus, Cedar Crest Boulevard & I-78, Allentown, PA, USA 18103
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  • John F. McCarthy
    Affiliations
    Lehigh Valley Health Network, Department of Emergency and Hospital Medicine, USF Morsani College of Medicine, Lehigh Valley Campus, Cedar Crest Boulevard & I-78, Allentown, PA, USA 18103
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Published:January 28, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2020.01.051
      Opioid-related drug overdose deaths continue to rise at an alarming rate and have reached the level of a national crisis [
      Addressing prescription drug abuse in the United States: Current activities and future opportunities.
      ,
      • Sep A.
      Controlled substance, drug, device and cosmetic act-drug overdose response immunity.
      ]. Timely administration of naloxone (Narcan®) can reverse the respiratory depression characteristic of opioid overdoses. A series of state legislative changes have recently occurred enabling law enforcement to carry and administer naloxone [
      • Davis C.S.
      • Carr D.
      Legal changes to increase access to naloxone for opioid overdose reversal in the United States.
      , ]. Pennsylvania (PA), a state with one of the highest rates of death due to opioid overdose, enacted PA Act 139 in 2014, which allows first responders to administer naloxone to people with suspected overdoses and provides immunity to those responding to and reporting overdoses [
      Addressing prescription drug abuse in the United States: Current activities and future opportunities.
      ,
      • Sep A.
      Controlled substance, drug, device and cosmetic act-drug overdose response immunity.
      ]. The Act also mandated an online training program – approved by the PA Department of Health - for police officers in PA [
      • Sep A.
      Controlled substance, drug, device and cosmetic act-drug overdose response immunity.
      ].

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