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Sepsis alerts called in the field vs the ED: impact of severity and in-hospital confounders

      We read with great interest the paper published by Mixon et al. [
      • Mixon M.
      • Dietrich S.
      • Floren M.
      • Rogoszewski R.
      • Kane L.
      • Nudell N.
      • Spears L.
      Time to antibiotic administration: sepsis alerts called in emergency department versus in the field via emergency medical services.
      ], who reported that sepsis alerts called in the field via emergency medical services (EMS) decrease time to antibiotics and increase the likelihood of antibiotic administration occurring within 60 min of arrival, when compared to sepsis alert called in the emergency department (ED), but don’t affect strong outcomes including mortality, in hospital and intensive care unit length of stay.
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