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The efficacy of ginger for the treatment of migraine: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled studies

  • Liyan Chen
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: 118 Xingguang Avenue, Liangjiang New Area, ChongQing 400013, PR China
    Affiliations
    Department of Neurology, Chongqing General Hospital, University of Chinese Academy of Science, Chongqing, PR China

    Chongqing key laboratory of Neurodegenerative Disease, Chongqing general hospital, Chongqing, PR China
    Search for articles by this author
  • Zhiyou Cai
    Affiliations
    Department of Neurology, Chongqing General Hospital, University of Chinese Academy of Science, Chongqing, PR China

    Chongqing key laboratory of Neurodegenerative Disease, Chongqing general hospital, Chongqing, PR China
    Search for articles by this author
Published:November 17, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2020.11.030

      Abstract

      Introduction

      The efficacy of ginger for migraine remains controversial. We conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the influence of ginger versus placebo on treatment in migraine patients.

      Methods

      We have searched PubMed, EMbase, Web of science, EBSCO, and Cochrane library databases through September 2020 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of ginger versus placebo on treatment efficacy in migraine patients. This meta-analysis is performed using the random-effect model.

      Results

      Three RCTs are included in the meta-analysis. Overall, compared with control group in migraine patients, ginger treatment is associated with substantially improved pain free at 2 h (RR = 1.79; 95% CI = 1.04–3.09; P = 0.04) and reduced pain scores at 2 h (MD = −1.27; 95% CI = −1.46 to −1.07; P < 0.00001), but reveals no obvious impact on treatment response (RR = 2.04; 95% CI = 0.35–11.94; P = 0.43) or total adverse events (RR = 0.80; 95% CI = 0.46–1.41; P = 0.44). The incidence of nausea and vomiting is obviously lower in ginger group than that in control group.

      Conclusions

      Ginger is safe and effective in treating migraine patients with pain outcomes assessed at 2 h.

      Keywords

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